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Updated: 1 hour 37 min ago

Physical Activity: what’s the latest guidance?

Fri, 02/19/2021 - 09:32

In this blog for health professionals, Dr Rebecca Gould, Cochrane UK Fellow and Sport and Exercise Medicine Registrar, summarises the recent changes in global and UK physical activity guidelines for adults and looks at some of the Cochrane evidence available on physical activity.

The post Physical Activity: what’s the latest guidance? appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Health awareness events as opportunities for sharing health evidence: choose with care

Fri, 02/12/2021 - 15:43

This blog explores the pros and cons of health awareness events as opportunities for sharing evidence, and how to choose and use them wisely.

The post Health awareness events as opportunities for sharing health evidence: choose with care appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Antenatal steroids: demystifying the benefits and risks

Fri, 02/05/2021 - 10:19

In this blog for pregnant women and the people involved in their care, Fiona Stewart, Cochrane Network Support Fellow, looks at the latest Cochrane evidence from a review she co-authored on antenatal corticosteroids for women at risk of preterm birth and how it links to the Cochrane logo.

The post Antenatal steroids: demystifying the benefits and risks appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Taking part in randomised trials: what influences people’s decision to participate?

Fri, 01/29/2021 - 09:36

Cathering Houghton blogs about what influences people's decisions to take part in randomised trials.

The post Taking part in randomised trials: what influences people’s decision to participate? appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Behavioural Activation Therapy for depression: what’s the evidence?

Fri, 01/22/2021 - 14:19

In this blog for people with depression and their mental health practitioners, Emily Sanger, a Junior Doctor in York, looks at the latest Cochrane evidence from two reviews on Behavioural Activation Therapy and explores how well it works for depression in adults, with and without long-term physical conditions.

The post Behavioural Activation Therapy for depression: what’s the evidence? appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Evidence for Maternity Care: new evidence and resources – Quarter 1 2021

Mon, 01/18/2021 - 09:42

The latest evidence and resources for midwives and clinical support staff.

The post Evidence for Maternity Care: new evidence and resources – Quarter 1 2021 appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Evidence for Allied Health: new evidence and resources – Quarter 1 2021

Mon, 01/18/2021 - 09:27

The latest evidence and resources for allied health professionals and clinical support staff.

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Evidence for Nursing: new evidence and resources – Quarter 1 2021

Mon, 01/18/2021 - 09:23

The latest evidence and resources for nurses and clinical support workers.

The post Evidence for Nursing: new evidence and resources – Quarter 1 2021 appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Reducing saturated fat intake: is it worth the effort?

Fri, 01/08/2021 - 09:14

Robert Walton, a Cochrane UK Senior Fellow in General Practice, blogs about the evidence on reducing saturated fat in our diets to help prevent cardiovascular disease. Few questions have caused so much controversy in science and medicine and debate over the breakfast table as the prevention of cardiovascular disease.  A recent Cochrane Review, Reduction in […]

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Exercise for intermittent claudication: does the type of exercise make a difference?

Tue, 01/05/2021 - 10:21

Dr Rebecca Gould, Sport and Exercise Medicine Registrar and Cochrane UK Fellow, looks at the latest Cochrane evidence on exercise for intermittent claudication (lower leg pain that comes on during exercise) and explores if the type of exercise undertaken makes a difference.

The post Exercise for intermittent claudication: does the type of exercise make a difference? appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Evidently Cochrane: Reflections on a different year, and looking ahead

Mon, 12/21/2020 - 09:48

In the final Evidently Cochrane blog of the year, Sarah Chapman and Selena Ryan-Vig, Cochrane UK's Knowledge Brokers, take a look back at some highlights on the blog in 2020.

The post Evidently Cochrane: Reflections on a different year, and looking ahead appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Publication bias: a problem that leaves us without the full picture on the benefits and harms of treatments

Thu, 12/17/2020 - 09:30

A large amount of medical research is never published and studies that are published are more likely to report favourable results. This blog explores how this ‘publication bias’ is a scientific and ethical problem that can lead to the benefits of treatments being overestimated, and harms being underestimated.

The post Publication bias: a problem that leaves us without the full picture on the benefits and harms of treatments appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Activities for people with dementia: what can evidence and experience teach us?

Fri, 12/04/2020 - 09:16

A blog about activities for people with dementia, drawing on evidence and experience.

The post Activities for people with dementia: what can evidence and experience teach us? appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Informal caregivers: the invisible people caring for cancer survivors

Thu, 11/26/2020 - 09:58

In this blog for informal cancer caregivers, Beverley Lim Høeg and Pernille Envold Bidstrup, who are both psychologists and cancer researchers, look at the challenges faced by those caring for a loved-one with cancer and explore why informal caregivers deserve more support and focus in cancer treatment and research. Pernille is also the mother of a 9 year old cancer survivor.

The post Informal caregivers: the invisible people caring for cancer survivors appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Prostate cancer: “To treat, or not to treat?”

Fri, 11/20/2020 - 15:33

In this blog for people making treatment decisions about prostate cancer, surgeons Francisco Lopez, Freddie Hamdy and Alastair Lamb explore the evidence, weigh up the benefits and harms, and suggest some questions that you may wish to discuss with your clinician. Artwork: ‘Challenge and Shelter in a Tough Year’ by Ruth Dalzell*. Prostate cancer is a […]

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Communicating about cancer: experiences and reflections

Thu, 11/19/2020 - 10:20

Throughout November, we are publishing a special series of blogs on Contemplating Cancer. We invited people to share their experiences and views on communicating about cancer in a tweetchat, and Sarah Chapman reflects on what emerged. Above artwork: ‘I am here’ by Jo Wightman, a self-portrait during chemo. It is part of the Breast Cancer Art Project. Following […]

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Cancer and Post-Traumatic Stress

Mon, 11/09/2020 - 15:14

Sally Crowe reflects on her experiences of post-traumatic stress (PTS) after being diagnosed and treated for a rare cancer - a common, but little talked about outcome of having cancer.

The post Cancer and Post-Traumatic Stress appeared first on Evidently Cochrane.

Communication with cancer patients: does practice make perfect?

Fri, 11/06/2020 - 09:32

Charlotte Squires reflects on the importance of communication skills for healthcare professionals working with people who have cancer, from her perspective both as doctor and a patient with advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma.

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